Common Myths Regarding Mani-Pedis

Taking care of one’s nails is not just a matter of esthetics, but also a matter of personal hygiene. Women love mani-pedis, but there are many misconceptions when it comes to these procedures. Today we are going to see what is the truth behind the most common mani-pedi myths that circulate the internet.

Myth 1: You should never cut your cuticles

True! This is probably something that most of you know, but we are going to go over it one more time, because a lot of women still do this due to esthetic reasons. Yes, cutting your cuticles is very wrong. The cuticles are an important defense, which protects your nails from infections. Cutting the cuticles is dangerous, because it is a delicate procedure, and it is very easy to go in too deep and cause an injury. Moreover, even if you don’t cause an injury, you will still leave your nails unprotected. Once you cut the cuticles, you are basically making a perfect entry point, through which bacteria can easily get under your skin. Last but not least, when you cut your cuticles, you will encourage them to grow longer, because your body is smart, and when it feels unprotected, it will try to reinforce the cuticles, to create a stronger defense against infections. The proper way to deal with cuticles, is to use a special cream or oil in order to soften them, and then use a special instrument to push them upwards. To avoid scratching the nail, don’t use metal cuticle pushers, and instead choose one made from plastic, or better yet bamboo.

Myth 2: Getting a mani-pedi at the salon can lead to infections

Partially true! If you go to a reputable salon that respects hygiene standards, and disinfects their utensils, there is no reason why you should be prone to infections. However, there are some less reputable salons, that are uninformed regarding the right procedures that need to be followed for hygiene purposes. You should always ask around to make sure that your salon follows the right procedures. Another myth that involves salon mani-pedis has to do with pedicure chairs. As you may have noticed, the classic chair and basin have recently been replaced with the modern pedicure chair. This chair has an integrated basin, and depending on the model, it can feature a pipe system or a jet system. Pipe system pedicure chairs should be avoided because there is always the chance of water and skin residue remaining in the pipes, which can indeed lead to infections. However, a pipe-less pedicure chair is completely safe to use, because the water is pumped in through a jet system and the basin in drained manually. 

Myth 3: Fish pedicures are dangerous

True: This is a rather obvious fact, but for some reason, fish pedicures remain legal in many countries. While the exotic nature of the procedure might seem tempting, you should stay away from fish pedicures at all costs. Consider the fact that it is almost impossible to drain the water after every customer, so you are basically soaking your feet in water that has already been used by someone else. Even if these fish spas were to drain the water after each customer, which most of them don’t do, they still use the same fish. So if a person has an infection or a disease, that could be transferred to the fish, which could in turn transfer it to you.

Myth 4: You shouldn’t get mani-pedis when you are pregnant

False: Yes, the fumes that come from nail polish are not healthy. However, you would need a lot of exposure in order for the procedure to be dangerous for you. A manicurist could face some health risks when she is pregnant, but this is unlikely for a woman who gets her nails done once a week. Nonetheless, if you want to be extra cautious, have your mani-pedi done in a well ventilated place and to be even more cautious, don’t use nail polish in the first trimester, when the baby’s organs are developing. You can also look for nail polish that has the 3-free label. This means that the product is free of tolune, formaldehyde and dibutyl phthalate. Last but not least, if you have your nails done at a salon, make sure that they properly disinfect their utensils.